Innovative Global Program

Academics: Curriculum
Curriculum
While undertaking Research-Based Learning, students also study foundational natural science courses, required specialized subjects and other disciplines to ensure they gain the deep understanding needed for advanced research.
Curriculum map

Throughout 1 through 4th year, students study in their Major each semester and pursue cutting-edge research while receiving supervision and mentoring from their supervisor, advisers, and post-graduate students in the same laboratory (Advanced Engineering Research Courses).

From 1 and 2nd year, students’ interest in various fields of engineering is stimulated by Introduction to Advanced Engineering Courses, showcasing advanced research by College of engineering faculty.

Also during the first two years, students build their solid foundation of scientific knowledge, methodology, and practical skills by studying Natural Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science courses needed to prepare for advanced research.

More advanced Specialized Courses are undertaken, mainly from 2nd to 3rd year, to acquire deeper knowledge and help students choose their graduation research project.

In Liberal Arts courses, focused on Communication, Social Science & Humanities, students learn to communicate professionally, confirm the wider social significance of their own research, and gain motivation to tackle various social problems. Physical Education, Health, and Japanese language courses are also available.

Throughout 1 through 4th year, students study in their Major each semester and pursue cutting-edge research while receiving supervision and mentoring from their supervisor, advisers, and post-graduate students in the same laboratory (Advanced Engineering Research Courses).

From 1 and 2nd year, students’ interest in various fields of engineering is stimulated by Introduction to Advanced Engineering Courses, showcasing advanced research by College of engineering faculty.

Also during the first two years, students build their solid foundation of scientific knowledge, methodology, and practical skills by studying Natural Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science courses needed to prepare for advanced research.

More advanced Specialized Courses are undertaken, mainly from 2nd to 3rd year, to acquire deeper knowledge and help students choose their graduation research project.

In Liberal Arts courses, focused on Communication, Social Science & Humanities, students learn to communicate professionally, confirm the wider social significance of their own research, and gain motivation to tackle various social problems. Physical Education, Health, and Japanese language courses are also available.

Major Major
Students can major in the following fields for specialized research:
  • Applied Chemistry
  • Computer Science
  • Materials Science
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Mathematics
  • Urban and Regional Planning
Advanced Engineering  Research Subjects Advanced Engineering  Research Subjects

For students to conduct active Research-Based Learning in their major, this course is required each year.

This course consists of a practical research project and a seminar. For their practical research project, from the first year, the student is assigned to their supervisor’s research laboratory and pursues cutting-edge research under the guidance of that supervisor and advisers.

For the seminar, students present and discuss their research in front of advisers from various specialized research fields. Having their research assessed by not just a single specialist but by specialists from other fields as well, fosters a multidisciplinary perspective.

Learning and practicing “What is research?” year by year:

For students to conduct active Research-Based Learning in their major, this course is required each year.

This course consists of a practical research project and a seminar. For their practical research project, from the first year, the student is assigned to their supervisor’s research laboratory and pursues cutting-edge research under the guidance of that supervisor and advisers.

For the seminar, students present and discuss their research in front of advisers from various specialized research fields. Having their research assessed by not just a single specialist but by specialists from other fields as well, fosters a multidisciplinary perspective.

Learning and practicing “What is research?” year by year:

1st year Freshman Thesis Program

Students are given a research topic and learn specific problem-solving methods under the guidance of higher level College students and postgraduate students.

2nd year Sophomore Thesis Program

Under a lab rotation system, students spend about two months at a time in laboratories of various disciplines, and learn to solve problems with a variety of approaches characteristic of each field.

3rd year Junior Thesis Program

In their third year, students reconfirm their supervisor and the laboratory in which they will conduct their Graduation Thesis Program. Having already grasped an overview of their major research field, the student then decides on a research team and actively pursues that research.

4th year Graduation Thesis Program

Students form a team, conduct their own research, and confirm their results. In addition, they will communicate those results to society in academic conferences. This becomes a vehicle for learning and practicing leadership and professionalism.

Introduction to Advanced Engineering Courses Introduction to Advanced Engineering Courses

Students are introduced to advanced research in a wide range of engineering fields from the first two years in order to develop a global perspective on current innovative approaches in various fields.

These courses introduce a range of research by faculty members from various disciplines to enable students to learn the scientific value and social significance of a variety of approaches.

Students synthesize what they have learned by writing reports on topics assigned for each class. These courses are scheduled in the first two years to awaken student interest in various disciplines of engineering, and to help them choose their future field of research.

Students are introduced to advanced research in a wide range of engineering fields from the first two years in order to develop a global perspective on current innovative approaches in various fields.

These courses introduce a range of research by faculty members from various disciplines to enable students to learn the scientific value and social significance of a variety of approaches.

Students synthesize what they have learned by writing reports on topics assigned for each class. These courses are scheduled in the first two years to awaken student interest in various disciplines of engineering, and to help them choose their future field of research.

List of Introduction to Advanced Engineering Courses:
  • Introduction to Advanced Science and Technology
  • Advanced Course on Mechanical Engineering
  • Advanced Course on Engineering Science & Mechanics
  • Advanced Course on Materials Science and Engineering
  • Introduction to Applied Chemistry
  • Introduction of Electrical Engineering Research
  • Introduction to Information and Communication Engineering
  • Introduction to Advanced Electronics
  • Lectures on Civil Engineering
  • Introduction to Computer Science and Engineering
Specialized Subjects Specialized Subjects

Mainly from Years 2 to 3, students study higher-level Specialized Courses that will serve as reference points for research pursued in their major Advanced Engineering Research Courses.

Each course contains content that builds on and deepens students’ basic knowledge of science and engineering, and strengthens their understanding of specialized fields, and particular research skills.

Mainly from Years 2 to 3, students study higher level Specialized Subjects that will serve as reference points for research pursued under Advanced Engineering Research Subjects, and gain broad knowledge.

Each subject contains content that provides students with a broad basic knowledge of science and engineering, a deep understanding of specialized fields, and research skills.

List of Specialized Courses:
  • Hydrodynamics
  • Combustion Engineering
  • Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry
  • Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
  • Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry
  • Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Polymer Chemistry
  • Solid State Chemistry
  • Introduction to Relativity
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Interaction Design
  • Experiments in Electronics Engineering
  • Soil Mechanics
  • Biophysics
  • Biophotonics
  • Nanotechnology
  • Nanostructure Physics I
  • Nanostructure Physics II
  • Materials Science
  • Materials for Energy
  • Advanced Techniques for Materials Characterization
  • Functional Materials
  • Practical Materialography
  • Magnetism and Magnetic Materials
  • Superconductor Materials
Mathematical Fundamentals and Information Mathematical Fundamentals and Information

These foundational courses have been scheduled mainly in Years 1 to 2.
This category contains the following:

Each course includes essential theory and practice to give students a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical skills in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, and Computer Science required to build a deeper understanding in Advanced Engineering Research Courses and Specialized Courses within their Major.

List of Foundational Courses:
・Mathematics
Pre-calculus
Calculus I, II, III
Linear Algebra
Probability and Statistics
・Chemistry
Basic Chemistry
Calculus I, II, III
General Chemistry A & B
Instrumental Analysis
・Physics
Basic Physics
Methodics in Physics
Physics: Mechanics
Physics: Thermodynamics
Physics: Electromagnetism
Physics: Fluidodynamics, Oscillations and Waves
Physics: Optics
Materials Physics
・Computer Science
Introduction to Multimedia Technology
Introduction to Computer Programming (Python, R, C, Java)
Web design and programming
Introduction to Computer Networks
Information Literacy
Introduction to Information Processing
Mathematical Fundamentals and Information Mathematical Fundamentals and Information
Communication:

To polish students’ professional communication,
the IGP includes 3 Communication courses for
students to practice writing and presenting their
research within the university and in international
forums.

To polish students’ professional communication, the IGP includes 3 Communication courses for students to practice writing and presenting their research within the university and in international forums.

Social Science & Humanities:

Social Science and Humanities courses to deepen
students’ understanding of the social context in
which engineering is utilized.

For example, “Diversity and Cultures of Other
Countries,“ is designed to to ensure the ability to
work collaboratively in an international team after
graduation; “Career Design” helps students find
their strengths, take responsibility to create their
own career direction, and practice professional
communication.

The required subject “Engineering Ethics” raises
students ability to make decisions and practice
ethically as engineers in society.

Social Science and Humanities courses to deepen students’ understanding of the social context in which engineering is utilized.

For example, “Diversity and Cultures of Other Countries,“ is designed to to ensure the ability to work collaboratively in an international team after graduation; “Career Design” helps students find their strengths, take responsibility to create their own career direction, and practice professional communication.

The required subject “Engineering Ethics” raises students ability to make decisions and practice ethically as engineers in society.

List of Liberal Arts Courses:
・Communication
Academic Writing
Research Presentations
Usage of Research Tools & Research Writing
・Social Science & Humanities
Engineering Ethics
Diversity and Cultures of other countries
Contemporary Society: Changes in Japanese
Work Culture in international perspective
Career Design: Developing Yourself for Your Future Career
Science and Religion in Japan
In addition, students have access to other Social Science & Humanities
courses taught in English in the College of Engineering.
Humanities and Social Science Liberal Arts Humanities and Social Science Liberal Arts

The course list also includes 5 subjects worth 6
credits that aim to maintain and improve students’
physical stamina and health, and increase
socializing skills. These include not only actual
sports practice, but also theoretical subjects such as
“Biomechanics of Human Movement.”

The course list also includes 5 subjects worth 6 credits that aim to maintain and improve students’ physical stamina and health, and increase socializing skills. These include not only actual sports practice, but also theoretical subjects such as “Biomechanics of Human Movement.”

List of Physical Education and Health Courses:
  • Biomechanics of human movement
  • Volleyball
  • Badminton
  • Golf
  • Table tennis
  • Soccer
University-wide Common Courses:

The subjects Japanese I, Japanese II and Japanese
III assist Japanese language acquisition for
non-native speakers of Japanese.

As the IGP conducts all classes in English, Japanese
language skills are not necessarily required for
study purposes, but these classes aim to support
everyday life in Japan for international students
and assist them in playing an active role in
Japanese companies and society after graduation.

The subjects Japanese I, Japanese II and Japanese III assist Japanese language acquisition for non-native speakers of Japanese.

As the IGP conducts all classes in English, Japanese language skills are not necessarily required for study purposes, but these classes aim to support everyday life in Japan for international students and assist them in playing an active role in Japanese companies and society after graduation.

Sample of Common Courses:

Japanese Levels I – IV

Japanese Levels I – IV

Advising course selection

A personlized Curriculum Map will be created with advice from the Supervisor and graduate students from the same research laboratory, and a four-year study design will be produced after determining the subjects to be studied and the skills to be acquired thorough practice.

A Curriculum Accommodation Plan (CAP) will be strictly followed to enable students to obtain the required credits.

Consulting with a supervisor and designing a four-year study plan ensures that each student has the essential foundation required to work as an engineer or research scientist, that the graduation requirements are met, and that the study time required to obtain credits is feasible.

A personlized Curriculum Map will be created with advice from the Supervisor and graduate students from the same research laboratory, and a four-year study design will be produced after determining the subjects to be studied and the skills to be acquired thorough practice.

A Curriculum Accommodation Plan (CAP) will be strictly followed to enable students to obtain the required credits.

Consulting with a supervisor and designing a four-year study plan ensures that each student has the essential foundation required to work as an engineer or research scientist, that the graduation requirements are met, and that the study time required to obtain credits is feasible.

Graduation requirements
Course Credit Requirements
  • Advanced Engineering Research Courses Compulsory Subjects: 64 credits
  • Introduction to Advanced Engineering Courses: credits or more
  • Specialized Courses: credits or more
  • Natural Science, Mathematics, Computer Science Courses: credits or more
  • Liberal Arts Courses (Communication, Social Science & Humanities; P.E. & Health; University-wide
    Common Courses): 6 credits or more including one compulsory credit
Total 124 credits or more

Graduation is conditional upon acquisition of a total of 124 credits (or more).

Students are required to complete all 64 credits from their Major and 1 credit for Engineering Ethics under Liberal Arts.

Students must obtain 6 credits or more in each of the following areas: Within their Major: Introduction to Advanced Engineering Courses and Specialized Courses; Outside their Major: Natural Science, Mathematics, & Computer Science Courses; and Liberal Arts Courses.

The Graduation Thesis Program will undergo multi-faceted assessment, not only by the supervisor but also several advisers to assure quality. It is also recommended that the thesis be submitted to and presented at an international conference.

Graduation is conditional upon acquisition of a total of 124 credits (or more).

Students are required to complete all 64 credits from their Major and 1 credit for Engineering Ethics under Liberal Arts.

Students must obtain 6 credits or more in each of the following areas: Within their Major: Introduction to Advanced Engineering Courses and Specialized Courses; Outside their Major: Natural Science, Mathematics, & Computer Science Courses; and Liberal Arts Courses.

The Graduation Thesis Program will undergo multi-faceted assessment, not only by the supervisor but also several advisers to assure quality. It is also recommended that the thesis be submitted to and presented at an international conference.